Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls?

For those interested in current studies regarding the Dead Sea Scrolls, an informative article is available at the online version of the Smithsonian Magazine.

Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls?

Resolving the dispute over authorship of the ancient manuscripts could have far-reaching implications for Christianity and Judaism

  • By Andrew Lawler
  • Smithsonian magazine, January 2010

The author came “to this harsh and remote site in the West Bank, known as Qumran, because this is where the most important religious texts in the Western world were found in 1947. The Dead Sea Scrolls, comprising more than 800 documents made of animal skin, papyrus and even forged copper, deepened our understanding of the Bible and shed light on the histories of Judaism and Christianity. Among the texts are parts of every book of the Hebrew canon, what Christians call the Old Testament, except the book of Esther. The scrolls also contain a collection of previously unknown hymns, prayers, commentaries, mystical formulas and the earliest version of the Ten Commandments. Most were written between 200 B.C. and the period prior to the failed Jewish revolt to gain political and religious independence from Rome that lasted from A.D. 66 to 70, predating by 8 to 11 centuries the oldest previously known Hebrew text of the Jewish Bible.”

Read more at:Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls

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